July 26 - August 28, 2015 Tamara Jaeger: Master Juggler

Join us to celebrate 25 years of representing Tamara Jaeger. Her quirkily inventive, wry and resonate wooden assemblages are among Ohio’s aesthetic treasures.
September 18 - October 30, 2015 Conception and Reduction:
Recent Landscapes by Eric Barth

Eric’s subtle control of the oil pastel medium, from his depiction of ethereal passages, such as Pushing the Morning Down, to his emotionally charged, scraped and incised abstracted works, such as Barricades, is remarkable. The artist continues to press the boundaries of the representation of nature in the direction of an abstracted distillation of forms that, nevertheless, has a true sense of place, time of day, and season.

There is a meditative quality that is evident in his art that has affinities with such late 19th century Tonalists and Barbizon artists as James Whistler and Camille Corot, as expressed in Pushing the Morning Down and Reduced. Works such as Copse, have a reductive physicality which relates to the work of Gerhard Richter. These inventive pastels are sensitive, personal statements that transcend representation.

  Line and the Landscape:
Recent Drawings by Marc Lincewicz

The range of Marc’s mastery of line, tone, texture, and washes, as well as the paper itself, is extraordinary. His aesthetic vocabulary continues to grow with each exhibition of his unique drawings. The spongey density of the foliage in There’s Something There is contrasted with the inky, dark tones punctuated by the stark bare paper in Light before Dawn. The artist’s quirky playful use of line in The Little Town is very different than his attenuated, elegiac lines in Stillness. The spectrum of emotion expressed in these drawings is broad, as well. The haunting, iconic, brooding quality in the drawing, Of Places Both Fond and Familiar, versus the delicate, playful, animated quality of Quietly Awaiting Spring demonstrates the variation of moods which are expressed in his work.

Marc’s command of “mark-making” with ink and his ethereal handling of washes is akin to such 19th century artists as Samuel Palmer and Odilon Redon, as well as 20th century drawing masters, such as Charles Burchfield and James Castle. Yet, his drawings have their own personal poetry that subtly engages the viewer and remains enigmatic.

Marc was recently recognized with a Second Place Prize at the rigorously juried Ohio State Fair Fine Arts Exhibition. One of the two jurors was Janice Driesbach, the well-informed curator of the Akron Art Museum.


Willard Reader: Landscapes and Townscapes
(Second floor)

We are pleased to announce our representation of Willard Reader. We are presenting his paintings and watercolors for the first time at our gallery. He has long been recognized in southern Ohio for his exquisitely crafted and quietly evocative portrayals of the Portsmouth urbanscape and the southern Ohio landscape. His works are realistically rendered and yet reductively composed. Will’s work has been recognized the by Southern Ohio Museum, which has had two exhibitions of his art. His work was also recently included in two significant exhibitions at the Ohio Arts Council’s Riffe Gallery, entitled The Urban Landscape: A Tale of Grandeur and Abandonment and A Century of Ohio Watercolor, which traveled to the Southern Ohio Museum, as well.

    A Selection of Ohio's Regionalists
(Second floor)

Keny Galleries will open an exhibition of selected works in various media by Ohio Regionalists active between 1915-1950. Ohio Regionalism, because of the rich diversity of its economy – from traditional agriculture to heavy industry to mining – and its extraordinary blend of different cultures, became a fertile crossroads of aesthetic styles, subject matter, social mores, and religious beliefs. These paintings belie Regionalisms more simplified, grass roots, overtly narrative perception. There is an aesthetic element of Modernism in many of the works, which distinguishes Ohio’s Regionalism from that of more agrarian states to the west and south.

The exhibition will include several lithographs by George Bellows, a rare lithograph and desirable wallpaper design by Charles Burchfield, paintings by Emerson Burkhart, including his exceptional work, Farmhouse, several landscapes by Robert Chadeayne, an evocative charcoal drawing by Clara Deike, an outstanding, painterly industrial landscape by Carl Gaertner, and an extraordinarily fine work on paper by Lucius Kutchin, as well as several other works. This exhibition complements Authentic Narratives: Ohio’s Regionalists (1915-1950), which is on view at the Springfield Museum of Art from September 12, 2015 – January 17, 2016.

November 6 - December 30, 2015 James Thurber: The Art of Humor

Columbus native, James Thurber (American, 1894-1961), was an internationally-known writer, playwright, and iconic cartoonist for The New Yorker, active there in the 1930’s and 40’s. His humorous cartoons shall be the subject of an exhibition at Keny Galleries from November 6 – December 30, 2015. The show will consist of 25 original drawings from the family’s collection. The exhibition is being organized by James M. Keny of Keny Galleries in association with the Thurber House and James Thurber’s daughter, Rosemary Thurber, and granddaughter, Sara Sauers.


Exhibitions on view outside the gallery:

September 2, 2015 -
January 17, 2016
Authentic Narrativse:
Ohio's Regionalists (1915-1950)

at the Springfield Museum of Art


*Please note schedule is subject to change. 



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